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Author [NL] [FR] [ES] [DE] [SE] [IT] [NO] [MY] Topic: Let's talk ergonomics......  (Read 977 times)

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Offline Ove

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Re: Let's talk ergonomics......
« Reply #10 on: October 04, 2019, 06:45:49 AM »
With a spotsbike history, I was a front brake only rider, until I took a Harley round the mountain roads in Spain. Back brake was great for settling the bike on (tight) downhill bends.  On the RS I've found I continue to use the rear brake for settling it for bends. I've found it a bit unstable if braking hard for a bend using the front, regardless of suspension settings. That's braking for  not in the bend. It needs a slightly bigger margin than is polite off the front brake before it tips in nicely. Just the way I find it. Not complaining, just part of its character.

Online Oop North John

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Re: Let's talk ergonomics......
« Reply #11 on: October 04, 2019, 08:45:13 AM »
*Originally Posted by Ove [+]
With a spotsbike history, I was a front brake only rider, until I took a Harley round the mountain roads in Spain. Back brake was great for settling the bike on (tight) downhill bends.  On the RS I've found I continue to use the rear brake for settling it for bends. I've found it a bit unstable if braking hard for a bend using the front, regardless of suspension settings. That's braking for  not in the bend. It needs a slightly bigger margin than is polite off the front brake before it tips in nicely. Just the way I find it. Not complaining, just part of its character.

I like using the back brake if I want to scrub off a little bit of excess speed, and as you say it's of great use in hairpin bends.

I think the back brake is less likely to cause porpoising than the front, as it isn't as effective, and probably because of the geometry involved, and so using it for scrubbing off speed feels to me that the bike is less unsettled, ie less dive on the front forks.

Offline Dirty Dave

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Re: Let's talk ergonomics......
« Reply #12 on: October 04, 2019, 11:59:00 AM »
Check out trail braking for better control in curves, front brake usage....

18 Z900RS Jaffa
97 Honda Valkyrie
79 Honda GoldWing

Online MexicoMike

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Re: Let's talk ergonomics......
« Reply #13 on: October 04, 2019, 12:04:55 PM »
The front brake stops the bike!  I have never understood where this "don't use the front brake" myth came from.  It didn't exist with anyone I knew of when I learned to ride many years ago. People joked about people who believed it.  But I have never actually met anyone who rode that way.  Can't imagine how you could survive for long on the street using a rear brake as the principle stopper.   :027:

OTOH, the rear brake is very useful in a variety of situations where the front is not particularly helpful or can even cause a problem.  The rear can greatly help low speed maneuvering, tightening turns considerably.  At higher speeds when cornering, it can slow the bike without upsetting it.  Gravel/dirt are another place where, depending on the situation,  the rear can be helpful when the front can cause you to crash.

Of course, ABS pretty much eliminates any consideration at all when operating on pavement - just cram on the brakes and let the computer sort it out!  In the real world it can do it much better than humans can! :152:
MexicoMike
1973 Norton Commando, BMW R9T (Mexico)
2017 BMW R1200RS (Texas, USA)
2019 Z900RS Cafe (UK)

Offline eccles

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Re: Let's talk ergonomics......
« Reply #14 on: October 04, 2019, 02:16:48 PM »
 :0461:

Online Travelman

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Re: Let's talk ergonomics......
« Reply #15 on: October 04, 2019, 03:31:45 PM »
I think that the reluctance to use the front brake comes from bicycles, where over enthusiastic use sends you over the bars. Somehow this crept into motorcycling and it’s a demon that needs exorcising. If front brake isn’t your main brake then you aren’t riding properly. Essentially the rule goes front brake for speed, rear brake for control.

Offline Ove

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Re: Let's talk ergonomics......
« Reply #16 on: October 04, 2019, 06:49:46 PM »
We're all saying the same thing. Except, I also mentioned I'm not very impressed with RS's poise when braking hard prior to a turn. I find it needs a bigger margin than past bikes, to settle, before I tip it in. I've tried rebound adjustment without any noticeable improvement,  so returned it to stock and get off the front earlier and trail the rear if I still want to scuff some off.

Still fun, but it's  not as good as it ought to be, in my view.

Offline Hillie

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Re: Let's talk ergonomics......
« Reply #17 on: October 04, 2019, 06:55:38 PM »
Don't just poke around with suspension settings, consult a good resource and do it yourself based on measurements (not other people's settings that they say "work") or take it to a good specialist who does these things. It's worth it to spend some money on, because it improves both handling (and safety) as well as comfort.

But it's unlike the standard bike thing to do, which is to spend copious amounts on new parts.

In any case, either learn how to set up your suspension yourself, or have it done well. It's worth it, either way.

Offline Notsoaverageguy

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Re: Let's talk ergonomics......
« Reply #18 on: October 05, 2019, 04:58:15 PM »
The problem I think most are facing is that they are not riding the RS the way Kawasaki intended it to be ridden. 1st imagine you had a 1974 z900, and it was 1974! You would not be having this conversation cause you (if determined) were going to race this bike would be stripping it down and rebuilding from near scratch. Lower bars, rearsets and stripping a lot of weight. What we have today is not a “retro” performer. It’s a modern day version of a z900 made to ride, feel and look old school. I personally think Kawasaki NAILED it.
  I see nothing wrong with anyone who wants to ride their bike to an extreme, like some did back then. But remember back then we did not have a ZX or a Ninja if we wanted to REALLY go fast. And so it leaves us with 2 alternatives today.
1 learn how to ride the bike (no matter what we are used to) the way it was built.
2 modify it like we did back then to extract more out of it.
  I personally bought my Cafe to slow down a bit. Sold my fire breathing ZX10R for a reason. I still work on it for the guy who bought it. And when I test ride it, it puts a big grin on my face when I twist the throttle. That grin will never be had on the Cafe. It’s the difference of 70 hp.
  However, when I get on my Cafe and and motor along the highway or canyon it puts a big old grin on my face to. The grin of nostalgia, one that the Ninja could never give me.
Things should be made as simple as possible, but no simpler!
(Albert Einstein)

Online Andyb1962

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Re: Let's talk ergonomics......
« Reply #19 on: October 10, 2019, 08:24:01 PM »
I adjusted the rear brake lever up as it was too low for me.
I have adjusted the clutch and brake levers down slightly and fitted billet “shorties”.
The turned the risers 180 and pushed the bars away from me slightly . I also fitted grip puppies .

The bike now suits me.

I always alter the ergonomics to suit me on all my bikes .

Take your time and make all these adjustments over time . As you get used to the bike and feel the need to it . Always mark original position so you can return to standard .